Fire Season

Fire Season Author Philip Connors
ISBN-10 9780230761834
Release 2011-08-19
Pages 288
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'I've watched deer and elk frolic in the meadow below me, and pine trees explode in a blue ball of smoke. If there's a better job anywhere on the planet, I'd like to know what it is.’ For nearly a decade, Philip Connors has spent half of each year in a small room at the top of a tower, on top of a mountain, alone in millions of acres of remote American wilderness. His job: to look for wildfires. Capturing the wonder and grandeur of this most unusual job and place, Fire Season evokes both the eerie pleasure of solitude and the majesty, might and beauty of untamed fire at its wildest. Connors’ time up on the peak is filled with drama – there are fires large and small; spectacular midnight lightning storms and silent mornings awakening above the clouds; surprise encounters with smokejumpers, black bears, and an abandoned, dying fawn. Filled with Connors’ heartfelt reflections on our place in the wild, Fire Season is an instant modern classic: a remarkable memoir that is at once an homage to the beauty of nature, the blessings of solitude, and the freedom of the independent spirit. Advance praise for Fire Season: ‘A masterwork of close observation, deep reflection, and hard-won wisdom . . . an unforgettable reckoning with the American land’ Philip Gourevitch ‘His adventures in radical solitude make for profoundly absorbing, restorative reading’ Walter Kirn



Fire Season

Fire Season Author Philip Connors
ISBN-10 9780062078902
Release 2011-04-05
Pages 272
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“Fire Season both evokes and honors the great hermit celebrants of nature, from Dillard to Kerouac to Thoreau—and I loved it.” —J.R. Moehringer, author of The Tender Bar “[Connors’s] adventures in radical solitude make for profoundly absorbing, restorative reading.” —Walter Kirn, author of Up in the Air Phillip Connors is a major new voice in American nonfiction, and his remarkable debut, Fire Season, is destined to become a modern classic. An absorbing chronicle of the days and nights of one of the last fire lookouts in the American West, Fire Season is a marvel of a book, as rugged and soulful as Matthew Crawford’s bestselling Shop Class as Soulcraft, and it immediately places Connors in the august company of Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, Aldo Leopold, Barry Lopez, and others in the respected fraternity of hard-boiled nature writers.



Fire Season

Fire Season Author Philip Connors
ISBN-10 9780062078902
Release 2011-04-05
Pages 272
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“Fire Season both evokes and honors the great hermit celebrants of nature, from Dillard to Kerouac to Thoreau—and I loved it.” —J.R. Moehringer, author of The Tender Bar “[Connors’s] adventures in radical solitude make for profoundly absorbing, restorative reading.” —Walter Kirn, author of Up in the Air Phillip Connors is a major new voice in American nonfiction, and his remarkable debut, Fire Season, is destined to become a modern classic. An absorbing chronicle of the days and nights of one of the last fire lookouts in the American West, Fire Season is a marvel of a book, as rugged and soulful as Matthew Crawford’s bestselling Shop Class as Soulcraft, and it immediately places Connors in the august company of Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, Aldo Leopold, Barry Lopez, and others in the respected fraternity of hard-boiled nature writers.



Hiking North Carolina amp amp 39 s Lookout Towers

Hiking North Carolina amp amp   39 s Lookout Towers Author Peter J. Barr
ISBN-10 0895874334
Release 2008
Pages 271
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North Carolina's fire lookout towers once stood watch over the mountain forests. Today, they risk becoming forgotten monuments to the value of our wild lands. Hiking North Carolina Lookout Towers restores glory to these historic forest sentinels. It proves the lookouts to be scenic treasures accessible to anyone who enjoys a vigorous walk in the outdoors and the view from the top of a mountain.



Between Forest and Sky

Between Forest and Sky Author Sharon Stratton
ISBN-10 1894974166
Release 2006
Pages 223
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This is an enthusiastic and beautifully described account of one woman's career as a fire-tower observer: a simple, satisfying lifestyle that embraces life without modern amenities. Always attracted to the outdoors, Sharon Stratton had applied to be a fire-tower observer five times before she was finally accepted. She headed to the forest with only her dogs for company to lead a seasonal, largely solitary life of oneness with nature and immense responsibility. Her story reveals in intriguing detail how fire-tower observers live, shedding light on the community of observers stationed in towers and lookout sites throughout the boreal forests. Through her words, it's possible to experience the rush of adrenaline she feels when she spots and reports fires from atop her 100-foot tower, and to discover with her the beauty and diversity of the flora and fauna. Anyone who dreams of a solitary, simple existence will find Between Forest and Sky a memorable read.



All the Wrong Places A Life Lost and Found

All the Wrong Places  A Life Lost and Found Author Philip Connors
ISBN-10 9780393246483
Release 2015-02-16
Pages 256
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The prize-winning author of Fire Season returns with the heartrending story of his troubled years before finding solace in the wilderness. In his debut Fire Season, Philip Connors recounted with lyricism, wisdom, and grace his decade as a fire lookout high above remote New Mexico. Now he tells the story of what made solitude on the mountain so attractive: the years he spent reeling in the wake of a family tragedy. At the age of twenty-three, Connors was a young man on the make. He'd left behind the Minnesota pig farm on which he'd grown up and the brother with whom he'd never been especially close. He had a magazine job lined up in New York City and a future unfolding exactly as he’d hoped. Then one phone call out of the blue changed everything. All the Wrong Places is a searingly honest account of the aftermath of his brother's shocking death, exploring both the pathos and the unlikely humor of a life unmoored by loss. Beginning with the otherworldly beauty of a hot-air-balloon ride over the skies of Albuquerque and ending in the wilderness of the American borderlands, this is the story of a man paying tribute to the dead by unconsciously willing himself into all the wrong places, whether at the copy desk of the Wall Street Journal, the gritty streets of Bed-Stuy in the 1990s, or the smoking rubble of the World Trade Center. With ruthless clarity and a keen sense of the absurd, Connors slowly unmasks the truth about his brother and himself, to devastating effect. Like Cheryl Strayed's Wild, this is a powerful look back at wayward years—and a redemptive story about finding one's rightful home in the world.



Land on Fire

Land on Fire Author Gary Ferguson
ISBN-10 9781604698121
Release 2017-06-21
Pages 200
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“This comprehensive book offers a fascinating overview of how those fires are fought, and some conversation-starters for how we might reimagine our relationship with the woods.” —Bill McKibben, author of Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet Wildfire season is burning longer and hotter, affecting more and more people, especially in the west. Land on Fire explores the fascinating science behind this phenomenon and the ongoing research to find a solution. This gripping narrative details how years of fire suppression and chronic drought have combined to make the situation so dire. Award-winning nature writer Gary Ferguson brings to life the extraordinary efforts of those responsible for fighting wildfires, and deftly explains how nature reacts in the aftermath of flames. Dramatic photographs reveal the terror and beauty of fire, as well as the staggering effect it has on the landscape.



Mountains Of Memory

Mountains Of Memory Author Don Scheese
ISBN-10 9781587294075
Release 2001-11-01
Pages 255
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In Mountains of Memory, seasoned wilderness dweller Don Scheese charts a long season of watching for and fighting fires in Idaho's River of No Return Wilderness&151the largest federal wilderness area in the mainland United States. An inspiring tale of self-discovery,Mountains of Memory paints a complex portrait of the natural, institutional, and historical forces that have shaped the great forested landscapes of the American West. A student of nature writing as well as a fire lookout with over a decade of experience, Scheese recounts his life at the top of the world, along with daring adventures such as backpacking and mountaineering in the Bighorn Crags and kayaking down the Middle Fork of the Salmon River. All the while, he touches upon the mysterious and powerful realities of the wilderness around him and stunning dawns visible within the glass cage perched on a 9,000-foot mountain, stirring flashes of lightning visible all around the dark landscape as the radio crackles with reports of strikes observed and fires spotted, long-awaited trips down the mountain to civilization for cold beer and hot pizza. In the tradition of Edward Abbey and Gary Snyder, Don Scheese offers readers a meditation on the meaning and value of wilderness at the beginning of the twenty-first century.



Motorcycles I ve Loved

Motorcycles I ve Loved Author Lily Brooks-Dalton
ISBN-10 9780698164574
Release 2015-04-07
Pages 256
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“What the PCT is to Cheryl Strayed, the open road is to Brooks-Dalton.”—Cosmopolitan A powerful memoir about a young woman whose passion for motorcycles leads her down a road all her own. At twenty-one-years-old, Lily Brooks-Dalton is feeling lost; returning to New England after three and a half years traveling overseas, she finds herself unsettled, unattached, and without the drive to move forward. When a friend mentions buying a motorcycle, Brooks-Dalton is intrigued and inspired. Before long she is diving headlong into the world of gearheads, reconsidering her surroundings through the visor of a motorcycle helmet, and beginning a study of motion that will help her understand her own trajectory. Her love for these powerful machines starts as a diversion, but as she continues riding and maintaining her own motorcycles, she rediscovers herself, her history, and her momentum. Forced to confront her limitations—new and old, real and imagined—Brooks-Dalton learns focus, patience, and how to navigate life on the road. As she builds confidence, both on her bike and off, she begins to find her way, ultimately undertaking an ambitious ride that leaves her strengthened, revitalized, and prepared for whatever comes next. Honest and lyrical, raw and thoughtful, Motorcycles I’ve Loved is a bold portrait of one young woman’s empowering journey of independence and determination. From the Hardcover edition.



In Earshot of Water

In Earshot of Water Author Paul Lindholdt
ISBN-10 9781587299858
Release 2011-03-16
Pages 146
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Whether the subject is the plants that grow there, the animals that live there, the rivers that run there, or the people he has known there, Paul Lindholdt’s In Earshot of Water illuminates the Pacific Northwest in vivid detail. Lindholdt writes with the precision of a naturalist, the critical eye of an ecologist, the affection of an apologist, and the self-revelation and self-awareness of a personal essayist in the manner of Annie Dillard, Loren Eiseley, Derrick Jensen, John McPhee, Robert Michael Pyle, and Kathleen Dean Moore. Exploring both the literal and literary sense of place, with particular emphasis on environmental issues and politics in the far Northwest, Lindholdt weds passages from the journals of Lewis and Clark, the log of Captain James Cook, the novelized memoir of Theodore Winthrop, and Bureau of Reclamation records growing from the paintings that the agency commissioned to publicize its dams in the 1960s and 1970s, to tell ecological and personal histories of the region he knows and loves. In Lindholdt’s beautiful prose, America’s environmental legacies—those inherited from his blood relatives as well as those from the influences of mass culture—and illuminations of the hazards of neglecting nature’s warning signs blur and merge and reemerge in new forms. Themes of fathers and sons layer the book, as well—the narrator as father and as son—interwoven with a call to responsible social activism with appeals to reason and emotion. Like water itself, In Earshot of Water cascades across boundaries and blends genres, at once learned and literary.



Lookouts

Lookouts Author Ira Spring
ISBN-10 0898864941
Release 1996
Pages 220
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Examines the work of lookouts at fire stations in Washington's Cascades and Olympic Mountains



Fire Lookouts of Glacier National Park

Fire Lookouts of Glacier National Park Author David R. Butler
ISBN-10 9781467131148
Release 2014-06-09
Pages 127
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The first fire lookouts in the Glacier National Park region were simply high points atop mountain peaks with unimpeded views of the surrounding terrain. Widespread fires in the 1910s and 1920s led to the construction of more permanent lookouts, first as wooden pole structures and subsequently as a variety of one- and two-story cabin designs. Cooperating lookouts in Glacier Park, the Flathead National Forest, and the Blackfeet Indian Reservation provided coverage of forests throughout Glacier National Park. Beginning in the 1950s, many of the lookouts were decommissioned and eventually destroyed. This volume tells the story of the rise and fall of the extensive fire lookout network that protected Glacier National Park during times of high fire danger, including lookouts still operating today.



Eating Dirt

Eating Dirt Author Charlotte Gill
ISBN-10 9781553657934
Release 2011-09-02
Pages 288
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• Winner of the BC National Award for Non-Fiction • Nominated for the Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction and the 2011 Hilary Weston Writer's Trust Award. During Charlotte Gill’s 20 years working as a tree planter she encountered hundreds of clear-cuts, each one a collision site between human civilization and the natural world, a complicated landscape presenting geographic evidence of our appetites. Charged with sowing the new forest in these clear-cuts, tree planters are a tribe caught between the stumps and the virgin timber, between environmentalists and loggers. In Eating Dirt, Gill offers up a slice of tree-planting life in all of its soggy, gritty exuberance while questioning the ability of conifer plantations to replace original forests, which evolved over millennia into intricate, complex ecosystems. Among other topics, she also touches on the boom-and-bust history of logging and the versatility of wood, from which we have devised countless creations as diverse as textiles and airplane parts. She also eloquently evokes the wonder of trees, our slowest-growing “renewable” resource and joyously celebrates the priceless value of forests and the ancient, ever-changing relationship between humans and trees.



Smokechaser

Smokechaser Author Warren Yahr
ISBN-10 0893011800
Release 1995-01-01
Pages 253
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In the 1940s, the Clearwater Forest, a vast wilderness area in northern Idaho, was watched over by a unique breed of men - fire lookouts. It was an isolated, lonely life that was not for everyone. Warren J. Yahr came to Idaho as a teenager to work for the Forest Service and became a lookout in the remote Bungalow Ranger Station 28 miles from Pierce, Idaho, near the North Fork of the Clearwater River. In Smokechaser, he recalls his experiences during the years he worked as a lookout watching over large stands of virgin fir, pine, hemlock, cedar, and spruce. In the early 1940s, no commercial logging had yet been done in the Bungalow District, parts of which had burned off in the fire of 1910 and were just recovering. Mr. Yahr describes his experiences as a lookout - the struggles of daily life and the joys of wilderness living. He recalls the dangers of being lost in a snowstorm, befriending wildlife, and enjoying the remote wilderness. His experiences are told with enchanting good humor and give readers a unique opportunity to learn firsthand about this chapter of Idaho history.



Hellroaring

Hellroaring Author Peter M. Leschak
ISBN-10 UCSC:32106015999946
Release 1994
Pages 236
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Reviewed in the New York Times, award-winning author Peter Leschak chronicles his adventures as a U.S. Forest Service firefighter. From fighting fires in the swamps of northern Minnesota to the huge mountain fires of Idaho, Oregon and Wyoming, Peter clearly and vividly describes the danger, difficulty and excitement of dealing with a powerful, capricious enemy, letting readers see its many forms.



City of Thieves

City of Thieves Author David Benioff
ISBN-10 9781848943971
Release 2009-10-15
Pages 300
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From the writer of the award-winning Game of Thrones series for HBO based on the books of George R. R. Martin. Four months into the siege of Leningrad, the city is starving. Seventeen-year-old Lev fears for his life when he is arrested for looting the body of a dead German paratrooper, while his charismatic cellmate, Kolya, a handsome young soldier arrested for desertion, seems bizarrely unafraid. Dawn brings, instead of an execution squad, an impossible challenge. Lev and Kolya can find a dozen eggs for an NKVD colonel to use for his daughter's wedding cake, and live. Or fail, and die. In the depths of the coldest winter in history, through a city cut off from all supplies and suffering appalling deprivation, man and boy embark on an absurd hunt. Their search will take them through desolate, lawles Leningrad and the devastated countryside surrounding it, in the captivating journey of two men trying to survive against desperate odds.



Dirt Work

Dirt Work Author Christine Byl
ISBN-10 9780807001011
Release 2013-04-16
Pages 256
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A lively and lyrical account of one woman’s unlikely apprenticeship on a national-park trail crew and what she discovers about nature, gender, and the value of hard work Christine Byl first encountered the national parks the way most of us do: on vacation. But after she graduated from college, broke and ready for a new challenge, she joined a Glacier National Park trail crew as a seasonal “traildog” maintaining mountain trails for the millions of visitors Glacier draws every year. Byl first thought of the job as a paycheck, a summer diversion, a welcome break from “the real world” before going on to graduate school. She came to find out that work in the woods on a trail crew was more demanding, more rewarding—more real—than she ever imagined. During her first season, Byl embraces the backbreaking difficulty of the work, learning how to clear trees, move boulders, and build stairs in the backcountry. Her first mentors are the colorful characters with whom she works—the packers, sawyers, and traildogs from all walks of life—along with the tools in her hands: axe, shovel, chainsaw, rock bar. As she invests herself deeply in new work, the mountains, rivers, animals, and weather become teachers as well. While Byl expected that her tenure at the parks would be temporary, she ends up turning this summer gig into a decades-long job, moving from Montana to Alaska, breaking expectations—including her own—that she would follow a “professional” career path. Returning season after season, she eventually leads her own crews, mentoring other trail dogs along the way. In Dirt Work, Byl probes common assumptions about the division between mental and physical labor, “women’s work” and “men’s work,” white collars and blue collars. The supposedly simple work of digging holes, dropping trees, and blasting snowdrifts in fact offers her an education of the hands and the head, as well as membership in an utterly unique subculture. Dirt Work is a contemplative but unsentimental look at the pleasures of labor, the challenges of apprenticeship, and the way a place becomes a home.