Radical Equations

Radical Equations Author Robert Moses
ISBN-10 9780807031698
Release 2002-06-10
Pages 256
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At a time when popular solutions to the educational plight of poor children of color are imposed from the outside-national standards, high-stakes tests, charismatic individual saviors-the acclaimed Algebra Project and its founder, Robert Moses, offer a vision of school reform based in the power of communities. Begun in 1982, the Algebra Project is transforming math education in twenty-five cities. Founded on the belief that math-science literacy is a prerequisite for full citizenship in society, the Project works with entire communities-parents, teachers, and especially students-to create a culture of literacy around algebra, a crucial stepping-stone to college math and opportunity. Telling the story of this remarkable program, Robert Moses draws on lessons from the 1960s Southern voter registration he famously helped organize: 'Everyone said sharecroppers didn't want to vote. It wasn't until we got them demanding to vote that we got attention. Today, when kids are falling wholesale through the cracks, people say they don't want to learn. We have to get the kids themselves to demand what everyone says they don't want.' We see the Algebra Project organizing community by community. Older kids serve as coaches for younger students and build a self-sustained tradition of leadership. Teachers use innovative techniques. And we see the remarkable success stories of schools like the predominately poor Hart School in Bessemer, Alabama, which outscored the city's middle-class flagship school in just three years. Radical Equations provides a model for anyone looking for a community-based solution to the problems of our disadvantaged schools. From the Trade Paperback edition.



Radical Equations

Radical Equations Author Robert Parris Moses
ISBN-10 0807031275
Release 2001
Pages 233
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Argues that math and science literacy is essential for equality and citizenship, and suggests that the grassroots organizational techniques that sucessfully impacted Southern politics can be applied to math education.



Robert Parris Moses

Robert Parris Moses Author Laura Visser-Maessen
ISBN-10 9781469627991
Release 2016-02-24
Pages 456
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One of the most influential leaders in the civil rights movement, Robert Parris Moses was essential in making Mississippi a central battleground state in the fight for voting rights. As a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Moses presented himself as a mere facilitator of grassroots activism rather than a charismatic figure like Martin Luther King Jr. His self-effacing demeanor and his success, especially in steering the events that led to the volatile 1964 Freedom Summer and the formation of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, paradoxically gave him a reputation of nearly heroic proportions. Examining the dilemmas of a leader who worked to cultivate local leadership, historian Laura Visser-Maessen explores the intellectual underpinnings of Moses's strategy, its achievements, and its struggles. This new biography recasts Moses as an effective, hands-on organizer, safeguarding his ideals while leading from behind the scenes. By returning Moses to his rightful place among the foremost leaders of the movement, Visser-Maessen testifies to Moses's revolutionary approach to grassroots leadership and the power of the individual in generating social change.



On the Road to Freedom

On the Road to Freedom Author Charles E. Cobb Jr.
ISBN-10 9781616202262
Release 2008-01-15
Pages 388
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This in-depth look at the civil rights movement goes to the places where pioneers of the movement marched, sat-in at lunch counters, gathered in churches; where they spoke, taught, and organized; where they were arrested, where they lost their lives, and where they triumphed. Award-winning journalist Charles E. Cobb Jr., a former organizer and field secretary for SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee), knows the journey intimately. He guides us through Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee, back to the real grassroots of the movement. He pays tribute not only to the men and women etched into our national memory but to local people whose seemingly small contributions made an impact. We go inside the organizations that framed the movement, travel on the "Freedom Rides" of 1961, and hear first-person accounts about the events that inspired Brown vs. Board of Education. An essential piece of American history, this is also a useful travel guide with maps, photographs, and sidebars of background history, newspaper coverage, and firsthand interviews.



This Nonviolent Stuff ll Get You Killed

This Nonviolent Stuff ll Get You Killed Author Charles E. Cobb
ISBN-10 9780465080953
Release 2014-06-03
Pages 320
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Visiting Martin Luther King, Jr. at the peak of the civil rights movement, the journalist William Worthy almost sat on a loaded pistol. “Just for self-defense,” King assured him. One of King's advisors remembered the reverend's home as “an arsenal.” Like King, many nonviolent activists embraced their constitutional right to self-protection—yet this crucial dimension of the civil rights struggle has been long ignored. In This Nonviolent Stuff'll Get You Killed, civil rights scholar Charles E. Cobb, Jr. reveals how nonviolent activists and their allies kept the civil rights movement alive by bearing—and, when necessary, using—firearms. Whether patrolling their neighborhoods, garrisoning their homes, or firing back at attackers, these men and women were crucial to the movement's success, as were the weapons they carried. Drawing on his firsthand experiences in the Southern Freedom Movement and interviews with fellow participants, Cobb offers a controversial examination of the vital role guns have played in securing American liberties.



Educating for Insurgency

Educating for Insurgency Author Jay Gillen
ISBN-10 9781849352000
Release 2014-08-18
Pages 170
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Education for Rebellion. A manifesto for today's broken schools.



Quality Education as a Constitutional Right

Quality Education as a Constitutional Right Author Theresa Perry
ISBN-10 9780807095461
Release 2010-10-13
Pages 232
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In 2005, famed civil rights leader and education activist Robert Moses invited one hundred prominent African American and Latino intellectuals and activists to meet to discuss a proposal for a campaign to guarantee a quality education for all children as a constitutional right—a movement that would “transform current approaches to educational inequity, all of which have failed miserably to yield results for our children.” The response was passionate, and the meeting launched a movement. This book—emerging directly from that effort—reports on what has happened since and calls for a new scale of organizing, legal initiatives, and public definitions of what a quality education is. Essays include · Robert Moses’s historically rooted call for citizens, especially young people, to make the demand for quality education · Ernesto Cortés’s view from decades of work organizing Latino communities in Texas · Charles Payne’s interview with students from the Baltimore Algebra Project, who organized to make historic demands on their district · Legal scholar Imani Perry’s nuanced analysis of the prospects of making a case for quality education as a right guaranteed by the Constitution · Perspectives from scholars Lisa Delpit and Joan T. Wynne, and by teachers Alicia Caroll and Kim Parker, who provide examples of what quality education is, describing its goal, and how to guide practice in the meantime



Who Speaks for the Negro

Who Speaks for the Negro Author Warren, Robert Penn
ISBN-10 9780300211948
Release 2014-09-30
Pages 488
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First published in 1965, this is a unique text in the history of the American Civil Rights Movement. Robert Penn Warren interviewed a wide range of African American leaders, activists, and artists across the country, among them Martin Luther King, Malcom X, and James Baldwin. Sections from the transcripts of these interviews are combined with the author’s reflections on the interviewees and the Civil Rights Movement as a whole to create a powerful oral history of this all-important struggle. A new introduction by David W. Blight places Warren’s book in historical perspective. " In this new edition introduced by the eminent historian David Blight, Who Speaks for the Negro? reveals a provocative admixture of history's variance. Warren's book is a burden of the past from which we cannot escape. It summons us to awaken a more vital national heartbeat of reparations for an American dilemma."—Houston Baker, Vanderbilt University



The Making of America

The Making of America Author W. Cleon Skousen
ISBN-10 9780934364669
Release
Pages
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The United States of America has been blessed with the world’s greatest political success formula. In a little over a century, this formula allowed a small segment of the human family—less than 6 percent—to become the richest nation on earth. It allowed them to create more than half of the world’s total output in production and enjoy the highest standard of living in the history of the world. In this book, we learn how the Founding Fathers discovered this success formula. Much of this discovery is told in the words of the Founders themselves, so that the reader can feel the power of their minds sweeping away thousands of years of bad government and illogical laws to formulate a whole new society based on human freedom. By returning to the roots of the Founders’ thinking, and contemplating the logic that they used in establishing the Constitution, we can better understand the challenges and solutions that confront us in today’s political world. This eBook includes the original index, illustrations, footnotes, table of contents and page numbering from the printed format.



Rethinking Mathematics

Rethinking Mathematics Author Eric Gutstein
ISBN-10 9780942961546
Release 2005-01-01
Pages 179
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A collection of more than thirty articles shows teachers how to weave social justice principles throughout the math curriculum, and how to integrate social justice math into other curricular areas as well.



Ethnomathematics

Ethnomathematics Author Arthur B. Powell
ISBN-10 079143351X
Release 1997
Pages 440
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Presents the emerging field of ethnomathematics from a critical perspective, challenging particular ways in which Eurocentrism permeates mathematics education and mathematics in general.



Reframing Transformational Leadership

Reframing Transformational Leadership Author Issa M. Saleh
ISBN-10 9789462096387
Release 2014-05-05
Pages 120
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One of the more common causes of school system failure is the absence of effective leadership. Ideally, school leaders are supposed to be the change agents and facilitators whose primary mission is to improve school culture and bring about the effective transformation that leads to a model Professional Learning Community (PLC). School leaders must focus on developing human capital by working collaboratively with teachers, students, and all who are involved within the system. Effective school leadership has been examined from a variety of perspectives, with the focus ranging from the principles of servant leadership to moral imperatives and distributed perspectives. The debate on what constitutes effective school leadership continues to be wide-ranging and complex. Today’s research scholarship will be the groundwork for how tomorrow’s schools develop a new breed of leadership. Upcoming leaders will face new, unforeseen challenges, so they must re-evaluate strategies and re-work standard processes, in order to promote sustainable development within their respective school systems. Tomorrow’s leaders will be expected to lead a diverse collective of students and teachers, to foster an enduring and empowering culture among students, teachers and other stakeholders committed to build a successful learning community.



The Math Myth

The Math Myth Author Andrew Hacker
ISBN-10 9781620970690
Release 2016-03-01
Pages 240
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Andrew Hacker’s 2012 New York Times op-ed questioning the requirement of advanced mathematics in our schools instantly became one of the paper’s most widely circulated articles. Why, he wondered, do we inflict a full menu of mathematics—algebra, geometry, trigonometry, even calculus—on all young Americans, regardless of their interests or aptitudes? The Math Myth expands Hacker’s scrutiny of many widely held assumptions, like the notions that mathematics broadens our minds, that mastery of azimuths and asymptotes will be needed for most jobs, that the entire Common Core syllabus should be required of every student. He worries that a frenzied emphasis on STEM is diverting attention from other pursuits and subverting the spirit of the country. In fact, Hacker honors mathematics as a calling (he has been a professor of mathematics) and extols its glories and its goals. Yet he shows how mandating it for everyone prevents other talents from being developed and acts as an irrational barrier to graduation and careers. He proposes alternatives, including teaching facility with figures, quantitative reasoning, and understanding statistics. The Math Myth is sure to spark a heated and needed national conversation not just about mathematics but about the kind of people and society we want to be.



Using Past as Prologue

Using Past as Prologue Author Dionne Danns
ISBN-10 9781681231723
Release 2015-08-01
Pages 383
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In 1978, V. P. Franklin and James D. Anderson co-edited New Perspectives on Black Educational History. For Franklin, Anderson, and their contributors, there were glaring gaps in the historiography of Black education that each of the essays began to fill with new information or fresh perspectives. There have been a number of important studies on the history of African American education in the more than three decades since Franklin and Anderson published their volume that has pushed the field forward. Scholars have redefined the views of Black southern schools as simply inferior, demonstrated the active role Blacks had in creating and sustaining their schools, sharpened our understanding of Black teachers’ and educational leaders’ role in educating Black students and themselves with professional development, provided a better understanding and recognition of the struggles in the North (particularly in urban and metropolitan areas), expanded our thinking about school desegregation and community control, and broadened our understanding of Black experiences and activism in higher education and private schools. Our volume will highlight and expand upon the changes to the field over the last three and a half decades. In the shadow of 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education and the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, contributors expand on the way African Americans viewed and experienced a variety of educational policies including segregation and desegregation, and the varied options they chose beyond desegregation. The volume covers both the North and South in the 19th and 20th centuries. Contributors explore how educators, administrators, students, and communities responded to educational policies in various settings including K-12 public and private schooling and higher education. A significant contribution of the book is showcasing the growing and concentrated work in the era immediately following the Brown decision. Finally, scholars consider the historian’s engagement with recent history, contemporary issues, future directions, methodology, and teaching.



Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice

Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice Author Anita A. Wager
ISBN-10 0873536797
Release 2012
Pages 213
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"This collection of original articles is the start of a compelling conversation among some of the leading figures in critical and social justice mathematics, a number of teachers and educators who have been inspired by them-and who have inspiring stories of their own to tell - and any reader interested in the intersection of education and social justice. An important read for every educator, this book shows how to teach mathematics so that all students are given the tools they need to confront issues of social justice today and in the years ahead"--page [4] of cover.



Dear Josie

 Dear Josie Author Joseph Featherstone
ISBN-10 0807743267
Release 2003-01-01
Pages 185
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As an educator and journalist who has been closely observing schools for more than three decades, Joseph Featherstone is a powerful voice in the struggle for better schooling in our nation. This much-needed and beautifully written collection testifies to the importance of respecting children's minds, educating all children, the craft of teaching, and democratic values.



Uneven Tides

Uneven Tides Author Sheldon H. Danziger
ISBN-10 9781610441469
Release 1992-12-17
Pages 300
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Inequality has been on the rise in America for more than two decades. This socially divisive trend began in the economic doldrums of the 1970s and continued through the booming 1980s, when surging economic tides clearly failed to lift all ships. Instead, escalating inequality in both individual earnings and family income widened the gulf between rich and poor and led to the much-publicized decline of the middle class. Uneven Tides brings together a distinguished group of economists to confront the crucial questions about this unprecedented rise in inequality. Just how large and pervasive was it? What were its principal causes? And why did it continue in the 1980s, when previous periods of national economic growth have generally reduced inequality? Reviewing the best current evidence, the essays in Uneven Tides show that rising inequality is a complex phenomenon, the result of a web of circumstances inherent in the nation's current industrial, social, and political situation. Once attributed to the rising supply of inexperienced workers—as baby boomers, new immigrants, and women entered the labor market—the growing inequality in individual earnings is revealed in Uneven Tides to be the direct result of the economy's increasing demand for skilled workers. The authors explore many of the possible causes of this trend, including the employment shift from manufacturing to the service sector, the heightened importance of technology in the workplace, the decline of unionization, and the intensified efforts to compete in a global marketplace. Uneven Tides also examines the equally dramatic growth in the inequality of family income, and reviews the effects of family size, the age and education of household heads, and the transition to both two-earner and single-parent families. Although these demographic shifts played a role, what emerges most clearly is an understanding of the powerful influence of public policy, as increasingly regressive taxes, declining welfare benefits, and a stagnant minimum wage continue to amplify the effects of market forces on income. With the rise in inequality now much in the headlines, it is clear that our nation's ability to reverse these shifting currents requires deeper understanding of their causes and consequences. Uneven Tides is the first book to get beyond the news stories to a clear analysis of the changing fortunes of America's families. It should be required reading for anyone with a serious interest in the economic underpinnings of the country's social problems.